Back In The Day.. Tall tales about how it used to be.
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    Default Back In The Day.. Tall tales about how it used to be.

    Just like the title says. We're mostly well seasoned peeps that have seen a lot of changes in skateboarding and the industry.

    Back in the day, we didn't have skate shops in many states or cities, we didn't have the internet, or cell phones. The only places in many areas that sold skateboards only sold cheap, mass produced plastic crap. If you wanted to get a good set up you had to start with a Skateboarder Magazine and dig through the ads to find the telephone numbers of skate shops, usually located in southern California. Sometimes the two page ads would have an order form and price list. Usually, you had to call the shop and ask them to send you a catalogue. Also, that was what was called a "long distance call" which showed up on your parents bill as huge extra charge.. kinda like going over your data plan these days.. Then when the catalogue arrived 3 weeks later you had to get your parents to write a check or get a money order because few took credit card numbers... had to have a SIGNED credit card slip or phone authorization back then.

    So you'd fill out the order form and mail that back to the shop with a check for the total amount and wait another 4-6 weeks to get your gear. meanwhile a NEW Skateboarder Magazine would come out with even cooler stuff that you could have ordered if you had waited DOH!!!

    Anyway, the day the mailman delivered that box of holy grail gear that few others in your area had was indeed one of the happiest days of the summer. Sometimes they threw in free stickers if it was a big order. It usually came with several catalogues to hand out to friends drooling over your brand new California gear..

    There was no YouTube or streaming videos of any kind. Even a photograph had to be taken to a processing shop before you could see if it came out or not hahahaha..

    Anyway, when I see those old 70s set ups going for $500+ on eBay it was probably someone that had to go through the process above to get it the first time and deeply regrets letting it go or wrecking it..

    Last edited by NoSwitch; 08-04-2016 at 12:28 PM.

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    I came up 10 to 20 years after you. Late 80's/early 90's. Small town in Maine where you had to go to the next town over to go grocery shopping, the movies etc. After seeing "Back to the Future" all of the kids wanted to skate. There were 2 bike shops in town that sold professional skate gear and you were pretty much stuck with what they carried. Pretty much for boards it was the "Big Three" Powell and Peralta, Vision, and Santa Cruz. For trucks Indys, Tracker, Venture, and Thunder. Occasionally one would get the occasional subsidiary like Sims, or SMA eventually they carried World Industries. Anything else you had to order out of Thrasher.

    Since skating had a massive resurgence at the time the local government didn't know how to handle it and passed an ordinance against skating. A lot of places did at the time hence the popular "Skateboarding Is Not a Crime" sticker/t-shirt trend. World Industries came out with this ad in response:

    http://tinyurl.com/zrhz7sw

    Rodney Mullen was still skating freestyle and none of my friends were into it. As a matter of fact we would fast forward through is parts on the Bones Brigade videos on VHS.

    Nick had a TV show called "Skate TV" where they would show footage and interview the top skaters of the day. Living in Bumfuck Egypt this and Thrasher were the only connections that we had to overall skate culture.

    Since skating was banned a bunch of skaters got permission to set up a DIY thing with plywood ramps, rails etc that they built themselves but do to the "Skater vs. Metalhead" clique war it got destroyed by a group of the latter. Metalheads in general at that time were simply rednecks who listened to heavy metal and want to "See all the skater fags die!"

    There is a lot more I could write and maybe I will at a later time.
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

    I'm trying to be more Zen. What is the sound of me not giving a fuck?

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    this is a lot less in depth than the rest of your post(s) but something specific i've been noticeing as of late as far as the younger generation of skateboarders is concerned is their overall reaction to fisheye skate footage / photos. skateboarding has been portrayed as an athletic, performance-based sport so much over the past 5 years or so with an emphasis on nothing but the technical tricks (also through different media such as HD cameras with lots of long lens shots or even phone footage / instagram) that kids don't get fisheyes anymore, to the point where fisheye footage almost feels like cheating to them. they want to see the raw shit the way they would witness it in real life, they don't care about (nor want to see) the emphasis on the skater's surroundings, the close-ups, classic camera movement and overall fisheye look. i remember when i was a kid and just figuring out skating, fisheyes just seemed like the coolest shit (i know it's cliché as fuck but the point still stands). not only did it look obscure and intriguing, but it was also our little best-kept secret as skaters, filming with fisheyes was just our thing. and if you ever got one or knew someone who had one, you'd feel like a fucking pro skater just tripping out on how your spot and style looked different and kind of resembled what you'd see in pro videos (regardless of how shitty said fisheye was - you'd use your imagination and jump the leap before you even knew it). there's still some occasional appreciation for the fisheye and kids who 'get' it but a lot of them have been desensitized to that thing due to first discovering skateboarding under its modern form and media of choice (again, HD cams and phone footage / instagram)

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    Was that aimed at me?

    One of the other things that I've noticed though about most "Modern" skate vids is that they seem to be edited like commercials with quick jump cuts and no real continuity. It seems like the old Tommy Guerreros part in Future Primitive or Natas' part in "Wheels of Fire" there was something Kinetic about the footage like it was actual street skating going somewhere. Like "This is how we skate on our way to the skate spot." Now it's like "This is us at a skate spot (JUMP CUT) This is us at another skate spot (JUMP CUT)."
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRCK View Post
    this is a lot less in depth than the rest of your post(s) but something specific i've been noticeing as of late as far as the younger generation of skateboarders is concerned is their overall reaction to fisheye skate footage / photos. skateboarding has been portrayed as an athletic, performance-based sport so much over the past 5 years or so with an emphasis on nothing but the technical tricks (also through different media such as HD cameras with lots of long lens shots or even phone footage / instagram) that kids don't get fisheyes anymore, to the point where fisheye footage almost feels like cheating to them. they want to see the raw shit the way they would witness it in real life, they don't care about (nor want to see) the emphasis on the skater's surroundings, the close-ups, classic camera movement and overall fisheye look. i remember when i was a kid and just figuring out skating, fisheyes just seemed like the coolest shit (i know it's cliché as fuck but the point still stands). not only did it look obscure and intriguing, but it was also our little best-kept secret as skaters, filming with fisheyes was just our thing. and if you ever got one or knew someone who had one, you'd feel like a fucking pro skater just tripping out on how your spot and style looked different and kind of resembled what you'd see in pro videos (regardless of how shitty said fisheye was - you'd use your imagination and jump the leap before you even knew it). there's still some occasional appreciation for the fisheye and kids who 'get' it but a lot of them have been desensitized to that thing due to first discovering skateboarding under its modern form and media of choice (again, HD cams and phone footage / instagram)
    I don't know, I always felt that the fisheye was used just because it was more practical for filming lines and such. I get that you can use it to make things look bigger but really I see it just as a tool to make filming easier.

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    Rev J no not aimed at you at all. I also agree with you on what you said about most modern videos not portraying any cruising at all (even in terms of overall feel), if you're talking big name company videos that is. lots of underground videos / companies still value & showcase that aspect of skating though. now there's a dichotomy with trick- / performance-oriented videos on one side and chill videos with urban cruising and whatnot on the other side. most of the time I stick to watching older videos because back then everyone cruised through the city while also ripping hard as fuck !

    kk yeah you're right as well, to an extent. I personally couldn't care less how fisheyes make stuff look bigger, maybe because the effect never really fooled me, I could always decipher spots in fisheye footage pretty accurately. people started to use them in order to better film lines indeed, that still is their main purpose but when it comes down to the final result you can't deny fisheye clips have their own aesthetic - one that can really confuse non-skaters running into a skate video for the first time. the distortion, the vig, the look of the buildings in the background, the effect of the skater swerving towards / away from the lens. some filmers have gone as far as filming fisheye an art form by using it in crazy ways or inventing fancy camera movement. in photography the fisheye is an incredible tool as well, a lot of the best skate photos in history were shot fisheye especially after glen friedman's work straight up cemented the 80's. in that effect i still think the fisheye is a skater's thing, who else uses / loves that wacky lens so much in another field ? can you imagine soccer filmed fisheye ? (that would actually be fucking amazing)

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    I'm going to have to multi post since I can only embed one vid at a time I know you get my point but these are kind of what I'm talking about:



    There is just so much classic in that part. It is especially mind blowing to me when you think that he was doing all of that on a 10" deck.
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

    I'm trying to be more Zen. What is the sound of me not giving a fuck?

    C/S,
    Rev J

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    Or this:



    I'm still trying to find out where in SF that is.
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

    I'm trying to be more Zen. What is the sound of me not giving a fuck?

    C/S,
    Rev J

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    They even did it in freestyle parts:



    It's funny I just retired a pair of those sneakers. Don Brown works for Etnies now.
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

    I'm trying to be more Zen. What is the sound of me not giving a fuck?

    C/S,
    Rev J

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    Natas was the shit back in the day. He was a hardcore street skater, not a glorified freestyle skater like most "street" skaters now
    youtube.com/user/theghengiskhan
    not much there yet, but more incoming

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    Freestyle riding is very special for all kinds of riders, One of my close friends lost his teeth when trying the free ride. I am still doing well. And the most important think that those video in this thread are relly great inspiration, I am astonished also!

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    Natas and the Bones Brigade brand of street skating was the next revolution in skating after the Z-Boys first took things vert and a little beyond. They took it back to the streets in a new way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GhengisKhan View Post
    Natas was the shit back in the day. He was a hardcore street skater, not a glorified freestyle skater like most "street" skaters now

    Sorry to be the "Wonky Freestyle Guy" here but even though I know what you're talking about I'm more likely to call it dumbed down freestyle skating.

    Freestyle skating is more about the lines than the individual tricks. How you link them together to form lines. For example here is one of my favorite modern freestyle skaters:



    I know it has that jump cut quality I was bitching about earlier but if you look at what he's doing and how he is connecting his tricks that is what freestyle skateboarding is. Not "OK I'm going to do a nollie healflip. Got that! Now I'm going to do a fakie bigspin! Got that!" Now go edit them together. Freestyle skaters generally use the momentum of the last trick to launch into the next trick. It is like building a sentence or a phrase as opposed to saying one word at a time. Where flatland street skating is at this moment could easily evolve/re evolve/devolve into a new form of freestyle skating that takes these "new" tricks and strings them in with the old ones. I'm a freestyle skater. I own it and I acknowledge it.

    Now that that little rant is over. Cool little bit of trivia. Natas was the first skater with his own shoe model. The Etnies Natas sneakers came out 6 months before the Vans Steve Caballeros. Coincidentally they were also the first mid top skate shoes, and the first "Skater Owned" shoe company started by French Freestyle skater Pierre Andre Senguerez.
    "Before diagnosing yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not just surrounded by assholes," William Gibson

    I'm trying to be more Zen. What is the sound of me not giving a fuck?

    C/S,
    Rev J

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